OUR STORY

Blackwing pencils were originally introduced by the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company in the 1930s. Their cult following included John Steinbeck and Chuck Jones, who proudly used Blackwings to create Bugs Bunny and many other Looney Tunes characters.

Despite this following, they fell victim to cost cutting measures in the 1990s and were discontinued. But, that didn’t stop devotees from paying as much as $40 per pencil to seize unused stock. In 2010, our company drew from nearly a century of experience in the pencil business to access the best materials in the world and bring Blackwing back for a new generation of writers, musicians, and others seeking a more natural existence.

Today, a portion of every Blackwing sale benefits music and arts education at the K-12 level.

THE BLACKWING FOUNDATION

A portion of the sales from all Blackwing products benefit the Blackwing Foundation, which funds and develops arts and music education at the K-12 level.

Your purchase helps provide, among other things, the instruction, learning environment and instruments children need to participate in the Little Kids’ Rock Modern Band Program.

THE BLACKWING CULTURE

We make pencils, notebooks and tools for creative-minded people, and others looking to unplug once in a while. Whether in the form of vinyl records and print books, or film cameras and worn-down pencils, we think there’s something in the tactile feel of an analog tool that is in our DNA. We try to tap into that feeling in our everyday lives by making things with our hands, and by valuing the creative process as much as the result.

We believe in the power of arts and music, as both a creative outlet and as an educational tool. That’s why a portion of every Blackwing sale benefits music and arts education through the Blackwing Foundation, and why we use projects like Blackwing Music to shine a spotlight on artists who deserve attention.

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It's in our DNA

People love the feel of a quality analog tool. From vinyl records and old books, to film cameras and worn-down pencils, there’s something analog in our DNA. We love being part of that experience.